Tag Archives: books

50+ Editors, Proofreaders, Copy Editors, Reviewers on Twitter

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Following are 50+ Editors, Proofreaders, Copy Editors, Reviewers on Twitter.  All were found on Twellow.com. Check it out.

Sally Dinius                          @SDinius                             Proofreader

Sandy617                             @sandy617                         Editor

Heilan Yvette Grimes     @yvettegr                          Editor

Tamoor                                @tamoor                             Editor

Terry Whalin                      @terrywhalin                    Communications Expert

Ryan Penagos                    @Agent_M                          Editor of Marvel.com

Ann Handley                      @MarketingProfs            Editor

Dan Howdle                       @NowGamer_Dan            Games Editor

Sandra Turner                   @SpiritLife                          Editor

Jen Nipps                            @jennipps                          Editor

Lee Pound                          @LeePound                       Editor

Maria Schneider               @mariaschneider            Editor

Dee Stewart                       @deegospel                        Editor

Amarantoblook              @amarantoblook             Editor

Ruthdfw                              @ruthdfw                           Editor, Reviewer

Heather Gemmen Wilson @HeatherWilson             Editor

Yvonne Perry                     @writersinthesky            Editor

Norm Goldman                 @bookpleasures.com    Editor, Publisher

Renai LeMay                      @renailemay                     sci-fi/fantasy book site

RJ Medak                            @RJ_Medak                        Book Reviewer

Christian Davidson         @REcessionRoadie          Non-fiction Book Editor

Jennifer Tribe                    @jennifertribe                  Editor, Book Coach

Madbushfarm                   @madbushfarm                 artist/cartoonist, editor

Alice Wessendorf            @awessendorf                    Editor

Blakeovard                         @DidYaQ                             Editor

Bob Spear                           @bobspear                          Editor, Publisher

A2editor                              @a2editor                           Editor

Esther Lombardi               @bookgeek                       Editor

S.B. Redd                             @maverickauthor           Editor

Birdie Newborn                @Birdie                               Editor, Publisher

Katharine Reeve              @kreeve                             Editor

Erika Kotite                         @etkotite                           Editor

Wendy Woudstra            @pubcentral                      Editor, Pub Coach, Publisher

Book Chook                       @BookChook                    Editor, Reviewer

Janice Hussein                 @DocumentDriven         Editor

Molly O’Neill                     @molly_oneill                   Editor (children’s books)

The Fiction Desk              @thefictiondesk              Editor, Reviewer

Lauren Hidden                  @LaurenHidden               Editor, Reviewer

Laura Nathan                     @lnathan                            Editor

The Compulsive Reader @compelledtoread        YA Reviewer, Aspiring Editor

Julia S.                                  @booktweeting               Editor, Reviewer

E.P. Ned Burke                  @nedburke                        Editor, Publisher

Sue Moe                               @Sue_Moe                        Editor (sci-fi/fantasy)

Matt Bell                              @mdbell79                         Editor, Reviewer

DeWayne Hamby             @DeWayneHamby         Editor (Christian pub world)

Michelle Witte                  @michellewitte                Editor (non-fiction)

Lisa Davis                           @LisaDavisMedia)           Editor, Publisher

Kelly Sabetta                    @BettaBookPublish)        Editor, Publisher

Steve Melito                      @SteveMelito                   Editor, Reviewer

WildWriter                         @WildWriter                      Editor, Writing Coach

ForstRose                           @ForstRose                       Editor, Proofreader, Reviewer

Serena Agusto-Cox        @SavvyVerseWit             Editor, Reviewer

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A List of YA Fantasy Writers on Twitter

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Twitter is an awesome place for finding like-minded individuals to learn from, converse with or network with. Here is a listing of YA Fantasy Authors who Twitter. If you’d like to be added, let me know. Enjoy.

tamoor | @tamoor Astrologer, Metaphysician, EFT, Writer, Author, Award Winning Author, Young Adult Fantasy, Dragons, Fairies, Visionary Fiction, Juvenile Fiction, YA Fantasy, Epic Fantasy, Books, Book Reviews, Editor, FREE Ebook, Publish, Publishing, Independent Publishing.  http://www.talesoftamoor.com Location: Umpqua Valley, Oregon

The Enchanted Inkpot | @EnchantedInkpot We are a community for writers and readers of middle grade and young adult fantasy.

Robert Jeschonek | @TheFictioneer Writer of urban fantasy, scifi, mystery, comics, Star Trek, Doctor Who, and more. Watch for upcoming Clarion young adult novel My Favorite Band Does Not Exist. Location: Johnstown, Pennsylvania

Carmen Bowles | @Cabowles2486 I’m writer who is a future bestseller from H-town. Genres: Young adult Romance, some sci-fi, and fantasy. I’m going for my degree in English.  Location: Houston, Texas

Marissa Miranda | @marissamiranda Current college student aiming to become a published young adult fantasy writer  Location: Florida, USA

Trulie Peterson | @TruliePeterson Writer of Young Adult fantasy and science fiction, among other things. Location: Florida

rrsmythe | @rrsmythe Young Adult Historical Fantasy Writer, therapist, taxi driver etc  Location: In the woods

Fiona Tankard | @writerinitaly British ghostwriter, writer and seo writer who has lived in Italy since 1994.  http://www.spiderywriting.com Location: Tuscany, Italy

Katherine Stillwater | @KStillwater Writer. Editing my first novel (Seventh Veil). Genre: young adult, urban fantasy, and paranormal-romance. Also, seeking an agent.  Location: West Hollywood, CA

Cheryl Rainfield / @cherylrainfield  Writer of Fantasy and Realistic YA. http://cheryl@cherylrainfield.com

Rebecca Ryals Russell / @vigorio Writer of MG and YA Dark Fantasy. http://yellowhatwriterrrussell.com Location: Wellborn, North Central Florida

How to Figure Out What a Reader Wants in a Story or Book

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What writer wouldn’t love sitting inside a reader’s head as they read a book, whether it is the writer’s or another’s? I would relish knowing what thoughts occur to a reader as they progress through the novel. Are the characters intriguing or boring? Are there too many characters or too few? Is the setting over described or too vague? Should the plot be pimped to make it more interesting or is it already all over the place? Where does the reader fit into the writing of a novel?

Unfortunately, we can’t sit inside a reader’s brain. But we can ask readers what they like and don’t when they read. And we can tell via sales whether a book lives up to a reader’s expectations. But while being written, is there some way a writer can try to zero-in on ways a reader reads?

After giving this some thought and investigation, I came up with the following list:

  1. According to reader desires, a good novel contains these elements, in this order:

Story-must be interesting

Characters-must have dimension

Theme-must be current

Atmosphere/setting-must seem genuine to story and genre

  1. Characters are the reason readers read. If the characters are boring or flat a reader will put the book down and pick up another with interesting, intriguing characters.

The main character must want something specific. Strong desire of a goal defines a strong character.

The main character must do something within the story. If all of the plot situations ‘happen’ to the character a reader gets bored. Sometimes the character must instigate the situation.

  1. Humor helps any story and readers love it. You don’t have to create a comedy, just insert some humor, especially where it’s not expected.
  1. Lastly, style is not nearly as important to a reader as it might be to a writer. The days of ‘purple prose’ are gone. Today’s readers want quickly flowing story with little narration and less description. Don’t eliminate either completely, just be judicious.

Finding the Title of your Short Story, Novella or Novel

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Finding the title of your short story, novella or novel can be frustrating and difficult. It took me several months of trying to finally arrive at the title Seraphym Wars. There are certain guidelines that help and bloggers have suggestions all the time. So I’m going to throw in my two-cent’s worth.

  1. Look at titles from your genre in the bookstore and online (Amazon.com or BarnesandNoble.com). Jot down your favorites.
  1. Keep it short and simple – one to three words works best. You may use a subtitle, but it’s not a requirement.
  1. Create a list of as many titles as you can think of that relate to your story’s theme, genre, characters, plot, setting (especially if you world-built). Use a thesaurus.
  1. Survey family and friends to choose their favorite three titles from your list. Narrow the list and resurvey until you have about five to choose from.
  1. Make sure it relates to the genre of your story.
  1. Use the title in conversation. Create a title page. How does it look and sound? If you don’t like it, change it. (I went through about four titles)
  1. Create a mock-up book jacket. Place the title on the spine and front. How does it look? Try this with the other four until you find one that displays well.
  1. Try using this link but don’t rely completely on it; use your own judgment. http://www.lulu.com/titlescorer/index.php (mine got a ‘22.9% chance of being a bestselling title!’ Which was the highest ANY of my suggestions got.)

What are some of the best titles you’ve come up with for stories?

What are some you came up with but didn’t use because they didn’t fit at the time?

Things I Learned About Writing in 2009

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2009 was the first full year of my life I spent predominantly writing.  My family had to learn to be more self-sufficient (especially the 15-year-old male who kept saying, “Whatcha gonna fix for me to eat?” and walked away disappointed when I said, “You can do it yourself.”)

It was also a year of personal growth unlike any other I’ve had. Even as a new mom or new teacher (many years ago), I felt I learned more about life this year as I observed others and wrote about them or created new characters using those observations.

Things I learned about Writing for Children and in General in 2009:

This is a biggie. I attended a Picture Book Writing Conference because it was close to home (none are EVER held in North Florida) and came away with enough knowledge to write four really nice picture books which are being considered by a publisher as we speak. YAY! I’d never considered writing picture books because I think so grandly, but it was an interesting challenge to refocus my thinking. I might even do some more.

I also took a very blah Middle Grades novel and rewrote it from stem to stern for a YA audience with romance and new twists and turns. I played around with a MG version as well, but have decided to move on to the second book in the series instead.

So what did I learn?

KISS-keep it simple stupid. I started with a huge premise that was overwhelming and even I couldn’t keep track of it. After losing a lot of that (destined for future books in the series) the actual story became clear and writable.

Know your Characters . The first characters I designed were flat and dull; one dimensional and too goody-goody. So I threw them out, renamed them even, and gave them flaws and quirks and attitudes. That’s when the love triangle appeared and really worked! See my posts about designing characters. How to Create a Compelling Character Part I  & II (https://rebeccaryalsrussell.wordpress.com)

Outline the basic book before writing. This provides several aspects that you won’t have to go back and try to insert later.

Arc-Every story needs an arc, a curve, a bell curve from start to finish. Without a basic outline you can’t see where it is or even if there’s one present. A story without an arc is flat and uninteresting. Each chapter should have one as well.

Inciting Incident-What happened to cause a story to begin?

Plot Points-There should be three definitive times when your main character and/or plot change direction or learn something.

Climaxes-Yes, I said plural. That’s because the climax should be broken into three parts. If you don’t outline, this could come too early or too late in the story. It shouldn’t occur before 50 pages from the end of the story, according to several blogs I read over the course of the year.

Climax A– Lighting the fuse

Climax B– Watch it burn

Climax C– Kaboom!

Denouement– Wrap up.

While editing is critical, you can over-edit as well. I’m bad for that. Every time I look at my MS I want to change things around, add something or remove something. After a while it’s not the same MS I sent off. There comes a point when you have to say, “Good enough” and move on to the next book. BUT, you also MUST edit. No one writes the perfect MS first, third or even the fifth time. It takes time to write a good book.

There is so much more I learned but can’t list it all here. Start your own list for 2010 and you’ll have a finished blog for January 2011. That’s what I’m going to do.

Things I learned about Blogging in 2009:

  • Do it often. Every week to ten days you should post something. (Although I don’t find the time to do this myself.)
  • Choose an audience and keep your posts relative.
  • Keep a file of Blogging Ideas from the news, other blogs, your own thoughts…
  • Shorter posts are easier to read. Break long posts into Parts.
  • Keep blog pages organized and clutter-free.
  • Keep pictures to a minimum as it takes them too long to load and some might lose interest.
  • Proofread posts before posting. Editors, publishers, etc, will see them.

Hopefully some of these ideas will help stimulate you to write or begin a blog or look into improving your writing by reading others’ blogs, etc. It’s how I’ve learned. There’s a wealth of good info out there waiting to be found.  I might even do a blog on that…